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A Parallel Pathway for Speech That Bypasses Primary Auditory Cortex - Neuroscience Seminar Series

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Title: A Parallel Pathway for Speech That Bypasses Primary Auditory Cortex 

Speaker:
Liberty Hamilton, PhD
UT Austin

On November 18 at 4:00PM
Streamed via MS Teams
Conference ID - 148 420 990#

A prevailing view of information flow through the auditory pathway posits that speech sounds are processed through a hierarchy from brainstem to thalamus to the primary auditory cortex and out to speech cortex on the superior temporal gyrus. Using a combination of high resolution ECoG grid recordings across the lateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) and core auditory areas on the temporal plane, cortical stimulation, and ablation, we show that this may not be the case. Instead, we find an area of the posterior STG that is activated in parallel to the primary auditory cortex at indistinguishable latencies. Stimulation of the primary auditory cortex does not appear to interfere with speech perception, which would be predicted if it provided the sole inputs to this area. I will discuss these results and implications for brain processing of speech.

Thursday, November 18 at 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Virtual Event

Persons with disabilities may submit a request for accommodations to participate in this event at UT Dallas' ADA website. You may also call (972) 883-5331 for assistance or send an email to ADACoordinator@utdallas.edu. All requests should be received no later than 2 business days prior to the event.

Event Type

Lectures & Workshops

Target Audience

Undergraduate Students, Prospective Students, Graduate Students

Topic

Research, Science & Technology

Tags

speech, Auditory, cortex

Department
Behavioral and Brain Sciences
Contact Information
Autumn Howell
autumn.howell@utdallas.edu
972-883-7274
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