Comet Calendar

From Molecule to Movement: Dissecting the Path from Dystonia Mutation to Motor Circuit Dysfunction - The speaker is William Dauer, MD, UT Southwestern. 

The goal of cognitive psychology and neuroscience is to understand the mind and brain, and in practice this means studying specific components of cognition, such as attention, perception, learning, and memory. Often, though, these components are studied in isolation, and we risk missing the forest for the trees. The overarching theme of our research is that cognitive processes are inherently interactive, and that exploring their behavioral and neural interactions can be an especially effective way to understand how they work.

PLEASE NOTE: RSVP is appreciated and lunch will be provided.
Email: cvlevents@utdallas.edu

Held in the 8th floor conference room at:
Center for Vital Longevity
1600 Viceroy Drive
Suite 800
Dallas, TX 75235

This talk will also be virtual, which you can join on MS Teams.

The Center for Vital Longevity 1600 Viceroy Drive Suite 800 Dallas, TX 75235

Behavioral and Brain Sciences

UTD strives to create inclusive and accessible events in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please contact the event coordinator (listed above) at least 10 business days prior to the event. If you have any additional questions, please email ADACoordinator@utdallas.edu and the AccessAbility Resource Center at accessability@utdallas.edu.

  • Christopher Tyler Short
  • Oly Khowash
  • Keerthana Natarajan
  • Yue Gu

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